Bryan and Melissa* were in their late 20’s when they decided to get married. Bryan was a hard-working, blue-collar man with large ambitions and a taste for the wild life. Melissa was quiet and easy-going. She came from a professional family, but had little ambitions of her own. They were at an age where “settling down” was the expectation, and they both saw advantages to being together. They planned for a marriage without children, and set out to build a life together.

But settling down didn’t work the way they expected. Bryan was making good money, but his job kept him on the road, where he continued to live life as though he was single. The children came, despite their plan. Feeling lonely and hurt, Melissa found comfort in spending and food. Life continued on, both feeling injured by the other’s actions, both acting out in the only ways they knew how. They bickered, and argued, and hid things from one another.

Over a decade passed before they were forced to acknowledge how bad things had become. Bryan’s credit cards started getting declined. Melissa had been handling the family’s finances for years; Bryan had no idea that they had over $100,000 of consumer debt, on top of their mortgage and car loans. Learning of their financial predicament was devastating. But, credit was easy, and home values were high. Bryan refinanced the family home to pay off most of their debt, and worked hard to erase the rest. The finances were “fixed”, but the relationship was hanging by a thread.

Despite the fear, anger and hard times, nothing really changed. Bryan continued living life on his own terms. Melissa continued spending. Both felt more justified in their own actions. They were both miserable, but neither were willing to change. The arguments increased, along with the debts, until finally they had to face the facts: This wasn’t going to work.

They set out with the intention of divorcing. But with two young children at home, both had their reservations. Melissa hated the idea of selling the house and uprooting the kids. Bryan didn’t trust that Melissa could responsibly handle money; He preferred supporting his children directly, and knowing where his money was being spent. Neither liked the idea of scheduled visitations and having the courts involved with raising their children. As much as they didn’t want to be married, getting divorced didn’t seem like the right option either.

In the end, Bryan and Melissa decided to pave their own way in their separation. Melissa and the kids would stay in the house, and Bryan would continue to support the family financially. Melissa was removed from all the accounts. Each was allowed to do as they pleased with their own money. Bryan was already living elsewhere, but could come and go at the house as he chose to see his kids, and to continue maintaining the house. They agreed that divorce was the logical step once the kids were out of school. They rarely spoke, and their only interactions involved the kids. Unusual as it was, being separated, but not divorced, worked for them. Did the legal status of their relationship really matter?

There’s a lot of hype around the changing landscape of marriage. As people’s feelings on religion and government have changed, couples choosing not to marry has become more and more acceptable. From a legal standpoint, there are pluses and minuses to getting married, depending on your incomes, assets, and goals. As laws change and social norms change, couples can choose to have children, buy homes, and even combine assets, without having to get married. More and more couples are choosing to create their own path, marrying or not marrying based on what seems right to them.

As much talk as there is about the changing landscape of marriage, there isn’t much talk about how these changes affect divorce. But as society moves towards seeing marriage as less of a necessity, it makes sense that how we see divorce would change as well. When a marriage crumbles, is divorce always the best option? Not from a “we should try to work this out” perspective, but rather from a financial perspective. If we don’t see it as necessary to bring the law into our unions, is it necessary to bring them into our separations?

To be continued…

– Cindy W.

*Names and some details have been changed for privacy purposes

It’s been over a month now since the boyfriend lost his job. Slowly but surely, we’re starting to find our way back to normal. Or, our new normal I should probably say. A lot has changed, but there’s a lot that still needs to be decided.

When you’ve been with a company for a long time there tends to be a blurring between your work life and personal life. The boyfriend had been with the “family of companies” for over 25 years, and always assumed he’d be there until he retired. He felt like his job security was rock solid, so he never much considered the “what if’s”. Being let go was a rude awakening, and the losses extended far beyond just losing his paycheck.

Since we worked for the same company, my boss was the one who informed me the boyfriend had been let go. She was nice enough to tell me I could take the rest of the afternoon off. I immediately tried to call him, only to get the President of the company; Since his cell phone was a company phone, they’d had him turn it in as soon as he was let go. The cell phone was his only phone. How was I supposed to get a hold of him? Where would he go?

Where he would go didn’t end up being much of an issue; He drove a company truck, so they dropped him off at our apartment after he was let go. That’s where I found him, sitting alone in the apartment, with no vehicle, no phone, no computer. Even if he had a way of calling someone, he couldn’t; He kept everyone’s numbers in his company phone. I understand that there are protocols and all that for letting someone go. But really?!? This is how you treat someone after 25 years?!?

I wasn’t really sure what to expect, but his mood was surprisingly calm, and he immediately started thinking about what we needed to do.

The first step was a vehicle. Luckily he’d bought an older Suburban from a friend 6 months prior. I’ll admit I didn’t feel like it was the best idea when he bought it. Sure, it was a great deal. But did he need it? And he didn’t have the cash, so he had to take out a small loan. At the time, it didn’t seem like the best idea. But it had already come in handy several times over the summer, and now it would prove to be a lifesaver. He’d left the Suburban at another friends house to have some cosmetic work done. So off we went to pick up his vehicle.

On the way back we stopped at Wal-Mart to buy him a cheap, temporary cell phone. He’d already decided to follow my lead and get a Republic Wireless phone, but he needed something to fill in for a few days until the phone arrived. My thoughts were to buy him a simple Trac-Phone. But, Wal-Mart being Wal-Mart, it wasn’t that easy. Have I mentioned I hate Wal-Mart? Apparently Virgin Mobile has sales reps at Wal-Mart lurking around their prepaid cell phones. The rep immediately pounced when he saw us, and talked the boyfriend into one of the Virgin Mobile phones. Which they ended up not having in stock. A 10 minute trip for a simple, temporary phone turned into an hour ordeal. And we still didn’t get a phone. The boyfriend had to make a second trip the next day.

All said and done, the Virgin Mobile phone cost him around $30, and he got a $25 prepaid, no contract plan with unlimited calls and 50 text messages. The rep had told him they would set the phone up, but that didn’t end up being the case, so he had some frustrations trying to get things setup. It was a basic flip phone, which was okay for the (less than a) week that he needed it. Of course, I was livid a few days later when I found out Virgin Mobile had been texting him non-stop, asking for responses rating their service, or general “how are things going” texts. Basically a scam to use all your texts, so you have to reload your plan before the end of the month. Not that we needed it for that long, but I saw this as a completely predatory practice. Especially given the economic situation of people who are typically buying prepaid plans. But his Republic Wireless phone came, and we were even able to port his new Virgin number over, so he didn’t have to contact everyone again to switch his number.

The next few weeks were spent filling in the gaps. We had to rebuild his contact list, and he had to reach out to all of his friends and family to let them know how to get ahold of him. He lost his company laptop, along with his company email address, which he had always used as his personal email address as well. For now we’re sharing my laptop, and I set him up with a new email address. It’s been a hassle going through and updating everything, from banking and credit cards, to loans and rewards programs. You don’t really think much about all the things you use your email address for. Some thing were easier than others. Chase was by far the worst; For security reasons, you can only log onto your account from a “known computer”. It wanted verification for him to sign in from my computer. How do they verify? Via text or email, of course! We spent over an hour trying to get through to someone at Chase to fix it so he could log into his account. When we finally reached someone, he was incredibly nice, and very helpful. It was just a long and tedious process!

In addition to the phone, and truck, and laptop (email!), the company also paid for the apartment where we stay. We’ve decided for now to keep the apartment. The rent is $700/month, plus electric, which runs from $60-90, depending on the season. Initially I offered to pay for the apartment, at least until he could get things sorted out. We finally settled on my paying half the rent. It’s looking very likely that we’ll be putting my house on the market as well. Finally!

At first, the boyfriend was hoping to find a similar supervisory position at another company. Now, he’s not so sure. Does he really want that kind of stress? And he’s technically eligible for retirement. How long does he plan to stick with it? Over the past few years, we’ve discussed moving, starting a small business, retiring. The world seems wide open, and we haven’t really decided what direction we’re headed in yet. But he obviously needed an income. So, being union, the boyfriend was able to let the union know he was unemployed, and get put “back on the board” for a job. He’s been back to work now for a few weeks. The job is technically temporary, but it’s looking like they might have more work lined up. Maybe enough to get him through the winter. Maybe longer. It gives him some breathing room to think about what he wants. Maybe he’ll stick with something like this until he’s ready to retire? Maybe another company will offer him something better in the Spring?

Of course, being back on the job means having to drive long distances to job sites. As part of his old contract, ALL of his fuel was paid for by the company, both for business and personal uses. The man hasn’t paid for gas in years. Maybe even decades! Do you know how much it costs to fuel a Suburban? The logical solution, given that I work less than 10 minutes from home, was that I would drive the Suburban, and he would take my Escape. It’s not a permanent change; We’ve talked about him trading the Suburban in for something more fuel-efficient. But, that’s going to have to be at least a few months down the road.

So, that’s where we are. It isn’t perfect, but it’s gone much more smoothly than we expected. We foresee some big changes in the future, and he’s hopeful that they come sooner, rather than later. But, that’s a post for another day.

– Cindy W.

 

It’s one of those times in my life where nothing seems to be going according to plan. I’m sitting here in our living room, eating crackers, trying to find a balance between feeling hungry and feeling like I’m going to yak.

It’s been a whirlwind since the week before I left for vacation. No one was “available” to fill in while I was on vacation, and, as the payroll accountant, my job couldn’t exactly be put on hold until I got back. So, I got to do two payrolls before I left, one normal, and one estimated. Then when I came back, I had to do a normal payroll, and then a corrected payroll for the one I estimated. As if that wasn’t fun enough, it’s end of month, and end of our fiscal year. To say I’m stressed out at work is an understatement!

So, of course, a few days before I left for vacation, I came down with a nasty cold. That didn’t help with my workload, and it made the drive down to Florida rough. Luckily, despite being trapped in a car with me for two days, no one else on the trip got sick. But resting up wasn’t exactly in the plans. We had a great time on our trip. But weeks later, I’m still a bit stuffy, and my cough isn’t going away.

I’m still playing catch-up on things for work. So, of course, I got called in for jury duty today. I have tons of respect for the American Judicial System, and completely understand the importance of jury duty. But it always seems to come at the worst time, doesn’t it? I was pulled in for a 3 day attempted murder trial, but sent home when they realized I had an indirect relationship with one of the prosecuting attorneys.

I left the courthouse with a massive headache, but every expectation of working late. Two hours later I found myself locked in the bathroom at work vomiting. Part of me thinks I have a migraine. The light hurts my eyes. A headache like none other. Nausea. Hard time looking at a computer screen. I’m so hot, which is unlike me; I’m the person who has a little heater under my desk all year-long. I’ve definitely been under enough stress, which I’ve heard can cause migraines. But, I’ve never had a migraine. And, since another girl left work last week with an overwhelming migraine, I’m kinda wondering if we aren’t actually passing a bug around.

I’m definitely starting to feel better. Back to work tomorrow! It’s going to be a long week. I’ll have to put in some long hours to get caught up, but that’s life in the working world!

– Cindy W.

The end of September meant the end of the 3rd quarter of 2014. Three fourths of the year is gone! Which means it’s the perfect time to check in on how I’m doing with my goals for 2014.

I set a goal of increasing my net worth by $10,000 in 2014. I started the year off with a total net worth of $1,216. As of September 30th I had a net worth of $7,791. That’s only a $6,575 growth so far this year. Which means I’m not exactly on track right now to make my overall goal; With 75% of the year gone, I’m about $1,000 short on growth.

Goal Chart - Where I ended 2013 vs where I am as of September 30th, 2014

Goal Chart – Where I ended 2013 vs where I am as of September 30th, 2014

When I laid out my plan for growing my net worth by $10,000 in 2014, I listed 3 steps, or “mini-goals”, that would get me to that overall goal:

1) Grow my 401 k by $5,000
2) Pay down $2,000 in debt through regular monthly payments
3) Pay down $3,000 in debt through additional principle payments

Tracking the difference between #2) Regular monthly payments and #3) Additional principle payments is really more involved than I want to get, so I’ve been combining those into one goal of paying down $5,000 in debt.

The weird thing is, it’s totally possible that I could make some (or all) of my mini-goals, and not make my overall goal of growing my net worth by $10,000. How is that possible? Because while my debts have been decreasing, and my 401 k is increasing, the value of my car and “liquid assets” (i.e. cash) have been decreasing. Those decreases are a major part of why I’m not on track right now to make my overall goal.

So, how am I doing on my mini-goals?

1) 401 k Growth: $3,494
I started 2014 with $8,861 in my 401 k plan. My current 401 k balance is $12,355, which means I’ve had $3,494 in growth. That puts me at right around 70% of my goal of $5,000 in growth. Honestly, I’m not sure if I’ll make my 401 k goal this year. I set my goal with the idea that both my employer and I would be contributing 6% to my 401 k plan. That amount would have more than equaled the $5,000 in growth; any dividend or interest increases would have been gravy. But earlier in the year I decided to put my own contributions on hold. That means I’m only getting my employer’s contribution, which is half of what I was expecting to be contributed into my 401 k in 2014. If I’m going to make my goal, interest and dividends will have to make up for the rest.

2 & 3) Debt Pay Down: $5,013
I started 2014 with $78,512 in debt, which includes my mortgage, student loan, and car loan. I’ve managed to widdle that amount down to $73,499. That means I’ve already made my goal of paying off $5,000 in debt!

Debt Payoff Chart comparing debts at end of 2013 vs September 30th, 2014

Debt Payoff Chart – Where I ended 2013 vs where I am as of September 30th, 2014

I had hoped to pay off my student loan this year, and had even started making some larger payments towards the balance. But then the boyfriend lost his job, and that plan was put on hold. For the time being, I’m back to building up my cash reserves, so I’m not sure I’ll be making any additional payments towards my debt this year. But my normal monthly payments will continue bringing the balances down. I expect I’ll have over $6,000 in debt paid off when 2014 ends.

With $3,494 in 401 k growth, and $5,013 in debt paid off, I’m 85% of the way to achieving my mini-goals. But my actual net worth has only increased by $6,575, or just over 65% of my $10,000 goal. See what I mean about making some goals, but not all? Regardless of whether I make all of my goals, I can still feel pretty good about the progress I’ve made this year. We all have good years and bad years. What matters most to me is that I’m staying the course, even if it takes a little longer to get there.

– Cindy W.

It’s officially the last day of September. Can you believe there are only 3 months left in 2014? Yikes! So, how did things go for September?

Net Worth as of September 30, 2014

Net Worth as of September 30, 2014

I knew it was going to be an expensive month, especially with a week-long vacation with my Mom and sisters in Walt Disney World. I came in right where I thought I would on spending, although I may have some money coming to me from one of my sisters. She lost her debit card at the end of the trip, so I ended up paying for a few things she said she would cover. If I’ve learned anything about my sisters though, it’s not to count on them when they say “I’ll pay you back”. I’m better off just assuming that money is gone.

I’m a little nervous about how the rest of the year will pan out. The boyfriend is still in the process of looking for a new job, and as of October 1st, we get to start paying rent on the apartment. We’re still sorting through how we’ll handle things financially. I’ve volunteered to cover the rent and utilities at the apartment, at least while we’re in the process of making some changes (like selling a house, or two). He’s not very comfortable with that idea. But unless some very big changes happen very soon, he may not have a choice.

Change is always scary. I don’t know what the rest of 2014 will hold for us. But I’m optimistic that as long as we work together, everything will turn out fine!

– Cindy W.

I find myself stuck in the ultimate blogging paradox: A lot of big things are going on in my life right now, so I have a ton of things I could be writing about. But, a lot of big things are going on in my life right now, which means I have very little time to sit down and write about them. Isn’t that always the way it goes?

It’s been less that a week since the boyfriend lost his job, and so far, nothing has really been decided. We’re dealing with the little things, like cell phones, and email addresses, and rebuilding his contact list. He has a few job prospects, but he doesn’t want to jump into anything too quickly. We’re weighing out all our options, trying to decide what steps we need to take next. Everything from where we live to where we work is up for discussion right now.

On top of everything that is going on, I leave for vacation in a couple of days. There’s packing, and shopping, and planning left to do. I feel really bad about leaving on vacation right now. Especially on an expensive Disney vacation. But I’ve already paid for the most expensive parts of the vacation; I can’t get that money back! And it would hurt the rest of the group if I backed out now, especially since the plan is to drive my car. The boyfriend is fine with me going. And having a little time to himself to think and get things done may not be a bad thing.

As I get time, I’ll start posting about some of the things that are going on, and some of the choices we’re considering. But things might be a little quiet here for the next week or so!

– Cindy W.

Last week I posted about feeling stressed with everything that is going on right now in my life. You know how the saying goes though: It could always get worse. So, of course, it did. Thursday afternoon, the boyfriend was called into the office and let go.

It came as a complete and total shock, and we definitely weren’t prepared. He’s been with this company since day 1, and was working for one of the original parent companies long before the company was started. Over 25 years, gone. He didn’t just lose a paycheck though; The company also provided his cell phone ( and the only cell phone number he’s ever had, along with all of his personal and business contacts), laptop, everyday vehicle, fuel, and the apartment.

I don’t think reality has fully set in yet. And I don’t think we’ll feel the full hit for a few more months. We both have some money set aside, and he has a small severance coming. He already has some options for a new job. But it’s highly unlikely he’ll find a job making what he had been, and he definitely won’t be able to recoup all the benefits. We’re definitely going to have to start making some tough decisions in the coming months.

Changes are coming, and I foresee things getting rougher before they start getting better. But in the end, I think things are going to end up better for us. The boyfriend’s job was causing him a lot of stress, and everyday he looked forward to the day he wouldn’t have to deal with it. I was constantly pushing him to make changes, so we could prepare things for a day when he could quit, and that was causing a lot of stress and misunderstandings in our relationship. Doing it on our terms would have been easier. But sometimes, things have a way of working themselves out.

For now, I’m putting all my financial plans on hold. No more paying ahead on the student loan; We just lost 2/3 of our household income! If we decide to stay in the apartment, we’ll have the added expense of rent and utilities. My plan for now is to fatten up the emergency fund, and cut any expenses I can. We did spend a good deal of time at my house this weekend, working on getting it ready to sell. We started really looking at what needed to be done, and really discussing how we should go about things. So we might actually sell a house. See? Something good!

It won’t be easy, but everything is going to be alright.

– Cindy W.

In August’s Net Worth Update, I mentioned that I put a chunk of cash towards paying off my student loan. I had $1,000 set aside in my saving’s account specifically for my student loan. I originally intended to wait until the end of the year to put a much large chunk of cash towards the loan. I hoped that I’d be able to come up with enough money to completely pay off the loan, although that’s looking less and less like it will be possible.

There were multiple reasons that I wanted to pay-off the loan in larger chunks, instead of bit by bit. The first reason is Sallie Mae’s reputation of “accidentally” messing up loan repayments when you try to pay ahead. My loan is set up on automatic monthly payments. I’m bad about remembering things, so automatic payments make things super seamless for me. Being on auto-pay also means that I get a small discount on the interest rate of my loan.

The second reason was because of my house. Although I was setting aside money ear-marked for the student loan, there was a little less stress knowing the money was there in case I needed it to sell the house. Like a secondary emergency fund. Which ended up being exactly the reason I ended up making the $1,000 payment last month. I saw that money as being available for something else. Giving myself permission to use money for something other than it’s intended purchase makes it susceptible to being poached for any number of reasons. If I was ever going to make progress on paying off the loan, I needed to start making progress on paying off the loan. Once the money is put towards the loan, it can’t be taken back to use for something else. Like the house. Or a vacation.

So I bit the bullet, and made a big payment towards the loan. When I made the payment, I set it up as an “additional payment”, and not to affect my normal payments. We’ll see how that works out. If it doesn’t? Oh well, I’ll just have to start making all of my payments manually. It’s not the end of the world. And the tiny discount I’m receiving will be more than made up when the loan is paid off.

When I made the extra payment in August, I started thinking about how often I should plan on paying more towards the loan. A thousand dollars seemed like a nice, round number. But at the rate of $170 a week, I’d be making an extra payment every 6 weeks. Call me impatient, but 6 weeks seems like too long. So I’m thinking maybe I’ll just start making an extra payment at the end of every month? Maybe a few days before the end of the month, so it will be adjusted for my net worth updates?

I’m sure there will be some bumps in the road, and I’ll change my mind as I go. I always change my mind as I go! But at least I’m making a plan to move forward. And forward is a great direction to go!

What do you think of my plan? Would you pay more monthly, at a set dollar amount, or save to make a larger payment?

– Cindy W.

If I’m being honest, life is a little overwhelming right now. Not in a dark, depressed sort of way. Just in a really, really, stressful sort of way. I feel like I have 5 million things on my plate right now, and I’m not really doing a good job with any of them. And over the last couple of weeks I’ve developed this lovely eye twitch, where whenever I’m stressed out my top and/or bottom eyelid starts spasming. Usually on my right eye, but sometimes on the left one too. So then I get to worry that, on top of being stressed and bitchy, that I look crazy as well. Fun times!

There aren’t enough hours in the day to get everything I need to get done at work. And I have to watch myself; I start getting ticked off about things, and then I find myself being less productive. Obviously that helps nothing. As much as I hate the cold, I find myself looking forward to when the weather changes. There’s only so much road construction that can be done in the Midwest once the cold and snow set in. A few of our departments work year round, but things are definitely calmer in the winter!

In less than two weeks we’ll be leaving on vacation! I’m really looking forward to the break, but getting ready to go is definitely adding to my stress. I’m sitting here early on a Saturday morning writing this as my car gets an oil change and a few other things taken care of in preparation of our big trip. I’m slowly working on pulling things together, so I’m not running around crazy at the last-minute trying to pack and get things done. I’m a procrastinator by nature, which usually means I get a little stressed (read: completely psychotic) as I’m trying to get everything done 5 seconds before we leave. Not this time! I’m trying to get as much done beforehand as possible, so I can just walk out the door when it’s time to go. But trying to squeeze everything in to an already tight schedule isn’t easy.

Money is stressing me out right now as well. It really shouldn’t be; I’m “fine” financially. I can cover all my bills, and have money for all my needs, and most of my wants. But I’m spending a lot, which means I might not make my goals for the year. This vacation is going to be pricey. I finally got a tree guy out to the house yesterday to quote trimming the tree the neighbors are complaining about. Yes, it’s been forever. We’ve had someone lined up to do it all this time, at a great price ($100!). But week after week, something else would come up. It was time to face the facts, he was never going to do the work. I’ve worked with a great tree guy before, but I’m guessing he retired, since his business no longer exists. The neighbors have worked with 5 different companies, and had issues with all of them. So, I found a company listed online with good reviews, and called them out. The guy quoted me to prune the tree, and “top” it. $1,250. Are you f-ing kidding me?!? He shrugged and pointed out that it is a 70+ foot tree. We finally came to a compromise; $550 for them to trim all the dead wood, and stuff hanging over the house.

I have $2,500 set aside for the house. But that money was intended for finishing things out to get the house ready to sell. I have been pairing back lately on the things I want to do before putting the house on the market. After all, I bought the house when it was far from perfect. I don’t need to turn it into a model home just to be able to sell it. I just need to sell it! Which is another stressor for me right now: The house! I’m way past ready for it to be gone. The boyfriend doesn’t understand. He sees the house as something I own. Security. How can owning something be a bad thing? I see it completely differently. The house is my past life. I was ready to sell the house years ago. Every dollar I put into that house is a dollar I can’t spend on the life I actually want to live. It’s costing me $500-600 a month on the mortgage and utilities alone. That doesn’t include the money I’m spending getting it ready to sell. Or the extra money for the tree, or the flood in the kitchen, etc. All the time and money I’m spending on the house is time and money I’d rather be spending on other things. I’m done.

Add in family, and being sick a lot lately, and life in general, and my nerves are fried. But in 2 weeks, I’ll be on vacation! Things are going to get better. I just have to buckle down and make it through. But that’s life!

Are you finding life stressful right now? What are you doing to try to improve things?

– Cindy W.

I’m a little late on posting August’s net worth; I wanted to wait until the long weekend was over before calculating the numbers. How did things pan out in August?

Net Worth as of September 2, 2014

Net Worth as of September 2, 2014

I had an almost $700 increase last month. Actually it should have been more, but the long Holiday weekend meant that my employer’s contribution to my 401k hasn’t posted yet. That would add an additional $263, making me solidly over $12,000 in my 401k plan. It may not be much, but it’s better every month. Little victories!

You’ll also notice that my student loan balance dropped significantly this month; $1,083 to be exact. Why? I had been setting aside money in my savings account towards paying off my student loan. Originally, I wanted to wait until I had a larger chunk of money to make a payment, because I worry about Sallie Mae messing up my regular monthly payments, which they are notorious for doing. But I also realize that large amounts of cash just sitting around in the bank have a way of finding other uses. Like, oh, I don’t know, Disney vacations? I started to feel like I’d never pay ahead on the loan if I didn’t start, you know, paying ahead on the loan. And, in the end, decreasing the balance by $1,000 was more important than keeping my $100+ monthly payments on track. I’ll just have to keep an eye on things, and if the regular payments don’t happen, I’ll just have to do them manually.

Slowly but surely my net worth is inching up! How was your August?

– Cindy W.